If you have been injured due to the actions of someone else, you may be worrying about things like lost time at work, medical bills, mortgage payments, household bills, or how to buy your groceries. These are things you shouldn’t have to deal with and should begin considering taking legal action to hold the other party responsible for the damages they caused.

Within the state of Florida, in order to collect financial restitution you must prove that the Defendant caused harm by failing to prevent the injury, whether by carelessness or negligence. The individual must also prove that they suffered damages as a direct result of the injury.

The most important thing to do is to save any evidence you may have, including medical documentation of your injuries, medical bills, video recordings, pictures of the scene, police reports, etc. If this accident has occurred recently, this will be easier to do, but it can also be completed later on down the road. However, in Florida, the Statute of Limitations on injury cases is four years from the date of the injury.

The only exclusion in the state of Florida is automobile accidents. Florida is a “no fault state”, meaning that each individual is responsible for paying for their own injuries regardless of who was at fault. Because of this regulation, every driver is responsible for carrying Personal Injury Protection (PIP) insurance, which would cover the treatment of their injuries. However, if the injuries sustained during the accident are serious (disfigurement or permanent loss of bodily functions) or fatal then a Personal Injury suit could be initiated.

There are some cases in which you may feel that more than one individual is at fault for your injury. For example, if someone is driving the bus you are injured on in a careless manner, you may feel that the bus company and the driver are both at fault. Any person found to be less than 10 percent responsible for your injury will not pay out of pocket; however, those found to be 10% or more liable will most likely be responsible for retribution payments. There are also cases in which you may be partially responsible for your own accident. In the State of Florida, if you are found guilty of any fault to your own injuries, the amount of financial compensation that you receive can be reduced.

Here are some things to do if you are involved in an accident and wish to pursue a personal injury suit:
• Write down anything and everything about the incident.
• Make a list of names and contact information of any witnesses at the scene.
• Report the accident to any proper authorities.
• Take photos or video as this can be used later as evidence.
• Contact your Personal Injury Attorney at Merritt Law Office today to see if you have a valid claim for compensation. We offer free case evaluations for all of our clients.

If you have been injured due to the actions of someone else, you may be worrying about things like lost time at work, medical bills, mortgage payments, household bills, or how to buy your groceries. These are things you shouldn’t have to deal with and should begin considering taking legal action to hold the other party responsible for the damages they caused.

Within the state of Florida, in order to collect financial restitution you must prove that the Defendant caused harm by failing to prevent the injury, whether by carelessness or negligence. The individual must also prove that they suffered damages as a direct result of the injury.

The most important thing to do is to save any evidence you may have, including medical documentation of your injuries, medical bills, video recordings, pictures of the scene, police reports, etc. If this accident has occurred recently, this will be easier to do, but it can also be completed later on down the road. However, in Florida, the Statute of Limitations on injury cases is four years from the date of the injury.

The only exclusion in the state of Florida is automobile accidents. Florida is a “no fault state”, meaning that each individual is responsible for paying for their own injuries regardless of who was at fault. Because of this regulation, every driver is responsible for carrying Personal Injury Protection (PIP) insurance, which would cover the treatment of their injuries. However, if the injuries sustained during the accident are serious (disfigurement or permanent loss of bodily functions) or fatal then a Personal Injury suit could be initiated.
There are some cases in which you may feel that more than one individual is at fault for your injury. For example, if someone is driving the bus you are injured on in a careless manner, you may feel that the bus company and the driver are both at fault. Any person found to be less than 10 percent responsible for your injury will not pay out of pocket; however, those found to be 10% or more liable will most likely be responsible for retribution payments. There are also cases in which you may be partially responsible for your own accident. In the State of Florida, if you are found guilty of any fault to your own injuries, the amount of financial compensation that you receive can be reduced.

Here are some things to do if you are involved in an accident and wish to pursue a personal injury suit:
• Write down anything and everything about the incident.
• Make a list of names and contact information of any witnesses at the scene.
• Report the accident to any proper authorities.
• Take photos or video as this can be used later as evidence.
• Contact your Personal Injury Attorney at Merritt Law Office today to see if you have a valid claim for compensation. We offer free
case evaluations for all of our clients.